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The Azure removal

This morning I woke up to check my blog and found it missing. That's not the best way to describe it, I found visiting the site Azure told me there was not website assocated with this domain name. I then found my Azure subscription missing both from the current and preview portal.

Unfortunately without having a subscription attached the portal I started looping through the support pages redirecting me back to the portal quite consistently. After some calls to the Australian support line (which didn't work on Saturday afternoon) I eventually found a live chat system. The very lovely and helpful support person tried to ask me to call the Australian number again but eventually gave me the US number.

Once I made it through the valley of the voice prompts on the US line (it didn't seem to understand Australian accents when trying to say AZURE BILLING) I did eventually get an operator who wasn't able to help me as the Azure team has a callback system but was able to help me navigate the support guantlet that is support.microsoft.com/osa to get a case created.

Within a few hours I received a call and as soon

2015: The year of the early mid life crisis

Welcome to 2015. I hope everyone enjoyed their holidays and had a great new years celebration.

This year I turn 30. That is an oddly difficult sentence to write. I'm sure it seems silly to anyone over 30, but I've found that around the 28-30 years old mark most people seem to go through a freak out (also called maturing) where they decide that maybe they shouldn't keep drinking each weekend until the sun rises and maybe continuing to pay rent is just wasting money.

I've also been share-housing now since I was 17 and I've long since had a rule that I wouldn't share-house with anyone over 30. They should have their life together enough to rent/own their place. I figure before I break my own rule I should really start considering all the adult decisions I continue to leave to future David.

I'd like to write about some of these thoughts and decisions this year, though going by my previous track record this will be my last post for another year.

MetroTwit: Designing the UI

A number of people have asked how exactly do we go about design the UI for MetroTwit, what it takes for a feature/idea to make it from a tweet/email to us to a release.

Our process is fairly simple... we fight... like brothers (we're all in separate states so our fights are over WLM/Skype). That may sound like a bad way to design but it means we are actively fleshing out the details from each of our perspectives and experiences and our shared understanding of the outcome we're trying to achieve.

Quite often there is no fight, we all agree on exactly how something should be implemeneted and it's recorded for when we get to actually programming that feature. On the rare occasion it comes down to a majority vote as to how something should look/act. Usually when we get to this stage we've already asked numerous people for their opinions or had user polls etc.

When it comes down to the exact design (the pixels that we know you all peek at when you change MetroTwit themes... you monsters) usually when coding a feature Winston (@winstonpang) and I will do the basic design/make it

MetroTwit: The 'Oh Crap' factor (Part 2)

As any astute reader might be able tell (for the 2 people that read this post) this post is a tad late... almost a year late.

So what happened? I will admit I'm fairly lazy when it comes to blogging, but mostly we let this little twitter app that turned out pretty cool go out into the big wide world and found ourselves in what I like to call the 'Oh Crap' period of doing something new.

A lot has happened since Part 1 of this story, we went from a very small alpha of about 25 people to opening open MetroTwit to the public with over 800 users registering to be notified of the beta.

Of course we were wise enough to release the beta in a nice quiet period in our lives so we could easily get bugs fixed and out to all the new users from a lot of different countries. Except we didn't. We released the MetroTwit beta during the Microsoft ReMix 2010 Conference in Melbourne while were attending sessions and 'networking' events at night. Over the 2 days of Remix we released 6 new versions of MetroTwit to combat all kinds of issues with Non-latin

The making of MetroTwit : The Big Bang (Part 1)

It was a sunny Saturday Morning on the 27 March 2010 when I got up to check my daily RSS Feeds. I found a post from Long’s IStartedSomething site with a screenshot of his idea for a Metro-inspired Twitter Client with the hope of making it an awesome Silverlight Out of Browser app. (See the original post here MetroTwit: a Metro-inspired Windows twitter client)

My first thoughts were cool, I reckon I could smack together that UI in Blend (I’ve done plenty of mashing xaml in Blend as I’ve always learnt better with the raw Xaml than the UI tools). My background is not in .NET Apps, I’ve been to many MS conferences and played with a lot of .NET ‘Stuff’ but never created a production application.

I figured I’d leave it to other .NET Developers but I’d see what I could throw together. By that afternoon I had the basic layouts and design of a Silverlight Application starting to happen with the main window when Long woke up and came online.

After sending Long a quick copy of where I was up to, we decided this project might actually be a goer. When

The making of MetroTwit : The Big Bang (Part 1)

It was a sunny Saturday Morning on the 27 March 2010 when I got up to check my daily RSS Feeds. I found a post from Long’s IStartedSomething site with a screenshot of his idea for a Metro-inspired Twitter Client with the hope of making it an awesome Silverlight Out of Browser app. (See the original post here MetroTwit: a Metro-inspired Windows twitter client)

My first thoughts were cool, I reckon I could smack together that UI in Blend (I’ve done plenty of mashing xaml in Blend as I’ve always learnt better with the raw Xaml than the UI tools). My background is not in .NET Apps, I’ve been to many MS conferences and played with a lot of .NET ‘Stuff’ but never created a production application.

I figured I’d leave it to other .NET Developers but I’d see what I could throw together. By that afternoon I had the basic layouts and design of a Silverlight Application starting to happen with the main window when Long woke up and came online.

After sending Long a quick copy of where I was up to, we decided this project might actually be a goer. When